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Philadelphia Man Arrested in Cold Case from 1991

Posted by Joseph D. Lento | Sep 04, 2019 | 0 Comments

Police in Philadelphia have made an arrest in a cold case from 1991. The way they investigated the case, though, draws attention to new police technologies and the importance of your Sixth Amendment right to have a criminal defense lawyer present during police interviews.

Philadelphia Police Make Arrest in 1991 Murder Case

Police arrested the then-boyfriend of Denise Sharon Kulb, a 27-year-old whose body was found in Chadds Ford in November 1991.

According to the reports of the arrest, police used photo-enhancing technology on pictures taken of the crime scene and the suspect's apartment around the time of the alleged murder. That technology apparently revealed a pair of socks that had been separated – one was on Kulb's body at the crime scene, while the other sock was at the suspect's apartment.

Police also made much of inconsistencies in the suspect's interviews that spanned over the course of three decades. In an interview in 1991, the suspect said that he last saw Kulb on October 18, 1991, when they bought drugs and were robbed at knifepoint. In a 2015 interview with police, though, the suspect said that he last saw her outside of a bar that same day.

The suspect is now being charged with murder and other charges, including abuse of a corpse, tampering with evidence, and obstruction of justice.

Plenty of Reasons to Be Skeptical of New Police Technology

Police have touted their use of photo-enhancing technology in making the arrest. Anytime law enforcement uses something new, though, it should trigger skepticism because of how often novel techniques have proved to be inaccurate. There are plenty of examples of past “revolutionary crime-detecting technologies” that have been found unreliable, like handwriting evidence, or lie-detector tests.

Even without details about how it works, photo-enhancing technology is disturbing. Police have one job: They look for evidence of a crime, or proof of someone's guilt. In many cases, they see what they want to see in otherwise inconclusive evidence. In their hands, photo-enhancing technology lets them do this, literally.

The Importance of Your Sixth Amendment Right to a Lawyer

The arrest and charges also highlight the importance of your Sixth Amendment right to have a lawyer present whenever police are interrogating you. As soon as you are put in custody and are being asked questions by police, you have a right to a lawyer and should use it. Police are professional interrogators who know how to make people feel at ease so they make incriminating statements. Most people forget this when they talk to police. They can pay the price when they are accused of committing a serious crime.

Philadelphia Criminal Defense Lawyer Joseph D. Lento

Joseph D. Lento is a criminal defense lawyer who serves the accused in and around the city of Philadelphia. With his help, guidance, and legal representation, you can fight against a criminal accusation, protect your rights, and secure your future.

Contact him online or call his Philadelphia law office at (215) 535-5353 if you have been arrested and accused of committing a crime.

About the Author

Joseph D. Lento

"I pride myself on having heart and driving hard to get results!" Joseph D. Lento has more than a decade of experience fighting for the futures of his clients in criminal courtrooms in Philadelphia, the Pennsylvania counties, as well as New Jersey. He does not settle for the easiest outcome, and instead prioritizes his clients' needs and well-being.

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Attorney Joseph D. Lento has more than a decade of experience successfully resolving clients' criminal charges in Philadelphia and the Pennsylvania counties. If you are having any uncertainties about what the future may hold for you or a loved one, contact the Lento Law Firm today! Criminal defense attorney Joseph D. Lento will go above and beyond the needs of any client, and will fight until the final bell rings.

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